Tag Archives: grades

Why The Invention of Online Grades was Frustrating in High School

By: Brad Manock

         reportcard   Most of the people reading will probably remember “report card day.” This was a very tense day where you would go home and your parents would have the report card in their hands, you would sit down nervously as the grades were discussed. If they were good grades it was fine, but if they were bad grades you would have to offer some kind of explanation as to why the grades were so low. Your parents would then make changes in your life depending on what you said in the hope of fixing the problem. However in high school “online grades” became used at my school. In this article I will discuss these online grades and how it felt like report card day every day.

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Why History Classes are Not Tought Properly

By: Brad Manock

 

         history   I recently graduated from college. I will continue my streak of talking about my educational experience and talking shit against the educational system by diving into the subject of history. For years I never understood the significance of history, why would it be one of the most important subjects? Until the very end of my very last history class of my college career, I didn’t know. In this article I will discuss why the subject of history is not presented to students well and what I would call the subject instead.

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Family Interference While Doing School Projects

By: Brad Manock

 homework

            One of the secrets that I held onto the most tightly during my days of attending high school were large projects. If I had a poster that I needed to paste clipping of pictures and text onto, it would be very important that my family never know about the project. Why? Once my family would find out about a project I needed to do, it was no longer MY project. It was their project. In this article I am going to discuss some of the frustration that comes along with attempting to complete projects in secrecy or to the quality standards of my family as opposed to my own standards.

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